Following allegations of sexual harassment, Activision Blizzard has hired two new executives

At a time when the corporation is dealing with serious claims, dismissals, and complaints, the company is making changes in its senior management. There will be further adjustments.

Following allegations of sexual harassment, Activision Blizzard has hired two new executives

The employment of two new directors from Disney and Delta has been confirmed by Activision Blizzard. Bobby Kotick, the company's CEO, will work alongside Julie Hodges, formerly of the Walt Disney Company, and Sandeep Dube, formerly of Delta Airlines, as Chief People Officer and Chief Commercial Officer, respectively.


The announcement comes at a time when the company has been embroiled in a scandal involving allegations of labor exploitation and sexual harassment, which is about to be sentenced in court by the state of California. In crucial areas like Human Resources and Commercial, these positions help to reinforce the company's image.


At Activision Blizzard, what's going on?

It all began in July of last year. The California Department of Fair Employment filed a complaint to "remedy, prevent, and deter civil rights abuses" at Activision Blizzard, according to the lawsuit. The corporation originally disputed everything, but as faults were discovered one by one, the mistrust of both investors and staff became unavoidable.

Following allegations of sexual harassment, Activision Blizzard has hired two new executives

More than 2,000 employees evaluated the actions taken as insufficient, as did Activision Blizzard's first weak response. Then came the departure of J. Allen Brack, Blizzard's president and a vocal critic of the situation. Soon after, the corporation's CEO, Bobby Kotick, stated that people will be held " responsible " for what occurred. Luis Barriga and Jesse McCree, Diablo IV's director and lead designer, as well as World of Warcraft designer Jonathan LeCraft, were among the first to be laid go.


On August 25, Activision was charged with concealing and destroying important evidence in this case. The gaming community's reaction has been negative, with nearly half of monthly active users gone in four years.


The most recent information we have regarding this matter comes from Thursday, when the North American corporation added another complaint to the list, this time from The Campaign to Organize Digital Employees (CODE-CWA), a labor rights organization. They say that intimidation and coercion were used to uncover suspected infringement of rights.


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