Parents may now set a limit on how much their children spend on microtransactions on Xbox

The spending limitations were added to the Xbox Family Settings software as a crucial feature requested by parents, according to Microsoft.

Parents may now set a limit on how much their children spend on microtransactions on Xbox


Microsoft is adding a function to the Xbox game system that parents have been requesting: The ability to prevent a child from using a credit card to buy virtual products.


If left unchecked, the purchase of in-game objects, often known as microtransactions, can quickly inflate a credit card account. As a result, Microsoft is adding a new feature in the Xbox Family Settings app to help parents monitor their children's gaming expenditures.


The Xbox team called the control "one of the most common pieces of feedback" it's had from parents about the Xbox Family Settings app, which Microsoft released last year.


“Feedback has ranged from, 'I'd want to add money to my child's account as a reward for excellent grades on their report card,' to, 'I'd like to add money to my child's account as a reward for good grades on their report card,' to, 'I'd like Is it possible to do this through the app?' to ‘How do I limit how much money my son can spend while he's gaming?' and ‘I want to offer my kid an allowance to spend money on games through the app.' In a message on Tuesday, the business said, "I don't want any surprises!"


A parent will be able to deposit a set amount of money into their child's account in order to purchase an Xbox system. If the money runs out, you'll have to politely ask your mother or father for more.


The money you put into your child's account can be used for anything, including games, in-game purchases like skins, and applications, according to the business.


Of course, parents have the option of never linking a credit card to their child's Xbox account. This would eliminate the possibility of going on a spending binge in the first place. However, Microsoft has developed an alternative feature called "Ask to Buy," which requires a child to first obtain permission from a parent before making a purchase if their account balance is insufficient.


“Parents can then make the purchase on their child's behalf (whether it's a game or app) or add money to their child's account for an in-game purchase, such as a new skin or an accessory,” according to the business. “Simply pick the ‘deny' button on the notification you receive if you do not wish to approve the purchase.”


The Xbox Family Settings app is available for both iOS and Android devices. A parent can also view a child's spending history as well as the current account balance using the app.

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